Book Review of Simonetta Carr’s Martin Luther

luthercoverIt’s been years since I have reviewed a book, but for Simonetta Carr I will break my blogging silence. There are two factors that have changed in my life since I posted my review of Carr’s biography of Knox. First, I have been homeschooling for three years, and secondly, I now have two avid readers, instead of three non-readers.

The first has informed how truly rare these books are. Trying to find a church history curriculum for elementary students has not been difficult. It has been impossible. Carr’s biographies are hands down the best elementary church biography resource available. I appreciated her work two years ago. I treasure it now.

Secondly, I now have two more avid readers living in my house. It is one thing to love a book as a read aloud to children. It is entirely another to have one’s nine year old announce at supper, “Did you know the doors to the Wittenberg cathedral burned in a big fire?” Both the nine year old mackerdoodle and seven year old cheesedoodle were able to read and comprehend the material, while the text is engaging enough for adults to study and enjoy. One can suspect the readability of material, but only real world reading by real world children can prove it.

Now, the story of Martin Luther is a tricky one to tell, especially to children. There is so much more than nailing theses, and much of the things we think we know about Luther aren’t true. Carr’s biography is faithful to the true story of Martin Luther. She includes the well known elements of his life, like the thunderstorm commitment to monasticism, and his nailing 95 theses to a door, and his statement to the Diet of Worms (excluding the oft quoted, but historically inaccurate “here I am, I can do no other.”). She also includes the peasant’s revolt,  the death of two of his children, and his treatise against the Jews later in his life. These elements of Martin Luther’s life are all presented in a gentle way, appropriate for children, while still being faithful to the subject.

Like in her biography of Knox, Carr humanizes Martin Luther. With Knox she made sympathetic an often vilified man. With Luther she makes ordinary a man who has been made so much larger than life. This is, interestingly, more difficult. Luther was a larger than life character. He used large and dramatic language. He had large and dramatic emotions. His life was a large and dramatic one. It is easy to forget that in the midst of that he was a father, husband, and teacher. Simonetta Carr brings that Luther to life. Carr’s other biographies serve as a sort of introduction to faithful men and women in church history that have been forgotten or misrepresented in our modern time. Her biography of Luther serves, instead, as an anchor amidst the hype that surrounds the name “Luther.”

However, to truly appreciate what drove Martin Luther, and some of the events in his life, I think some of that bigness needs to find a place in the story. As I mentioned in my review of Luther on the Christian Life, one of the driving forces in Luther’s theology was the idea of Anfechtungen, or emotional distress that pushes us always to our need for Christ. Luther’s struggle to direct and master his emotions in biblical ways is instructional, even for children. However, no biographer can include the details that every reader believes to be most important. The lack of that aspect of Luther’s life does not diminish this work.

Finally, in reviewing past biographies, I have been remiss not to mention the excellent illustrations contained in each of the books of the series. There is joy in a beautiful book, and this entire series is beautiful, from binding, to font choice, to illustrations. Troy Howell’s work is truly excellent.

 

I received no compensation for this post. I was provided an hard-cover edition for the purpose of review. I was not required to provide a positive one. I keep a disclosure statement here.

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About Coralie

After 11 years of infertility, I am now a mother to three, a wife of a Presbyterian (ARP) preacher and a struggling homemaker. Welcome to my little corner of the net. Kick off your shoes, put your feet up and join the conversation. View all posts by Coralie

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